Thursday, May 27, 2010

DADT

Like many of you, I try to stay away from discussing politics on my blog. And today isn't very different except for the fact that I'm just going to mention how disappointed I am in my state senator. I didn't vote for him so naturally I don't like him as it is-but this week is just worse. I do not, for the life of me, understand why someone-especially in Massachusetts (you know, the first state to allow gay marriage?)-would vote against the repeal of "Don't Ask, Don't Tell".

As someone who never really "got" what the big deal was in the first place, I have to admit that I don't "get" why DADT would not be repealed. Especially in this day and age. I can't wrap my brain around the fact that not only are there people who actually feel threatened by another persons sexual preference, but that they feel strongly enough about it that they fight to take away that persons ability to do something-whatever it is-because of it.

I don't know many people who have served in a war or who have been away from home for a long period of time. But it's fairly common knowledge that when the men and women in the Armed Forces are away, they're lonely and they miss their loved ones. I'd imagine that getting a letter or a care package filled with cookies or pictures brightens their day and I also imagine that at some point they share their happiness with a buddy.

A cookie to Stan, a piece of good news to Mike. And a "look at us in this picture-we're so in love" to Steve...But for those individuals who are not allowed to openly speak about their private lives, those pictures have to be hidden*.

I know that this is an over simplified look at DADT and that part of the policy is designed to protect gay men and women from being discriminated against and from being hunted (for lack of a better word) down and thrown out of the military for no reason other than their sexual preference. I guess what it really boils down to in my mind is that it's not the gays that should be thrown out-it's the people who actively discriminate against them that should have to go. And any policy that prevents another human being from living a certain way (which does not harm any other human being) is not OK in my book. And that is why I am baffled and disappointed in my state senator today.

In other news, this is my horoscope for today:

Something or someone has rekindled your fire today. You may find that though your emotions may seem a bit on the fanciful side, they are certainly quite strong and courageous. Hold on tight and don't let go...

I'm pretty sure that my fire has been rekindled overall, and not just for today...and yeah, I'm totally holding on tight.


"Don't Tell" prohibits military personnel from disclosing they are gay or have any kind of same-sex relationships-effectively permitting deeply closeted gays and bisexuals to serve as long as they do not "out" themselves and they are not "outed" by others"

8 comments:

LceeL said...

If there is one thing the military is - it is MACHO. And military machismo usually excludes any kind of association with 'gays' - who are seen as weak, effeminate and skittish. The stereotypical gay is anathema to the military mind.

Our society has those same deep seated mis-understandings of gays. And for the same reasons.

Because people - military AND civilian - are afraid that association with gays will make them doubt their own sexuality. And maybe make them gay, too.

SilverNeurotic said...

I hate any kind of discrimination-but I especially hate the types of discrimination gays and lesbians are put under every single day. DADT needs to eliminated-along with the laws that prohibit same sex marriage. Maybe one day it'll happen.

G.W. said...

I'm with ya Mags. I never understood the reasoning behind the DADT rule. I guess it is because of insecure meat-heads that are afraid of gay men seeing them in their underwear or sharing a shower.

My thought is, if people want to serve their country, then who cares if they are attracted to men or women.

With guys, there has always been a "fear" of having something think you are gay. Starts young and never really lets up. There is a stigma that being gay means you are girly or weak, and that's where the insults start. If a boy isn't good at sports then he is called gay slurs. Some guys take on that mentality, and others learn that it doesn't matter what the others say. I have been called all sorts of gay slurs and I laugh it off. Responding to ignorance only creates more ignorance.

I hope more people will realize that it isn't about who you love, but how you love. If you love your country enough to fight for it, then I applaud you regardless which gender you find attractive.

Mags said...

GW-(I just called you GQ by accident :) I think your statement "It isn't about who you love, but how you love." is perfect.

Vinny "Bond" Marini said...

EXCELLENT post Mags... This is a keeper...

Rocketstar said...

It's about time this country grew up and didn't allow religious dogma to foster hate.

Travis Cody said...

Hate, meanness, and rudeness must not stand. As much as DADT was allegedly designed to allow gays to serve without prejudice, it still discriminates against them because they are still required to hide who they are.

Colette said...

It's so sad to me that the men and women that serve to protect us are so discriminated against. Not just in sexual preference either. I just got done writing a paper about post traumatic stress disorder today, and after watching a Frontline video about it, I'm angered and disgusted with the way our military gets treated under certain circumstances. We took religion out of schools, why can't we take its stigmas out of our military too?